About animals

Goat Alpine, or Capricorn

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Plan
Introduction
1 Appearance
2 Distribution
3 Behavior
4 Systematics
5 Capricorn and man
6 Interesting Facts

Alpine Mountain Goat, or Capricorn (lat. Capra ibex ) - a species of artiodactyls from the genus of mountain goats, common in the Alps.

On average, an alpine mountain goat reaches a length of up to 150 cm and grows at the withers of about 90 cm. Females weigh about 40 kg, and males can weigh up to 100 kg. Males have impressive curved horns up to 1 m long, while females have only short, slightly curved horns. Both sexes have a beard. In summer, males have a dark brown coat color, and females are slightly reddish or with a golden hue. In winter, the coat of both sexes is gray.

Capricorn lives in the Alps at an altitude between the borders of the forest and ice. It can rise up to 3500 m above sea level. In winter it lives, as a rule, in lower areas than in summer, however, in summer it can also go down to alpine meadows in search of food. Overnight usually high in the mountains.

A typical herd of alpine mountain goats consists of 10-20 females and cubs. In addition to them, there are less stable herds of young bachelors, as well as mature males living alone. In the mating season, which lasts from December to January in the Alps, males visit herds and try to gain control over him. Between rival goats often comes to fights. In order to have a chance to win in such a duel and have his own herd, the male must be at least six years old. Throughout the winter, the male stays in the herd and leaves it in the spring.

After a pregnancy lasting from five to six months, the female in May or June gives birth to one, occasionally two, cubs. The baby is able to stay on his feet from the first day, but remains with his mother and feeds on milk for about a year. The life span of an alpine mountain goat can reach 20 years.

Alpine mountain goat is one of several species of the genus Capra called capricorn. For accuracy, it is often called an ordinary capricorn. He is a close relative of the Siberian mountain goat (Capra sibirica ), as well as the Nubian mountain goat (Capra nubia ), which was previously classified as an alpine mountain goat. The remaining species are closer to the bezoar goat (Capra aegagrus ).

5. Capricorn and man

In antiquity and in the Middle Ages, Capricorn was an object of strong mystification, as a result of which all of its attributes, from blood and hair to excrement, were used in medicine against all kinds of diseases. All this almost led to the extinction of Capricorn in Europe. At the beginning of the 19th century, the number of capricorns in the entire Alpine region barely exceeded 100 individuals, which were mainly preserved in the Italian Gran Paradiso. Forester Joseph Zumstein and naturalist Albert Girtanner managed to convince the authorities in 1816 to protect the last ibex in Gran Paradiso. In 1854, the king of Piedmont and Sardinia, Victor Emmanuel II, took capricorns under his personal protection. Thanks to the successful program for the new occupation of the Alpine mountains by capricorns, they are again found today in many parts of their original distribution area. All of today's capricorns come from those surviving 100 animals (see also bottleneck effect).

Despite the fact that Switzerland asked to sell her capricorns, Victor Emmanuel II did not allow their export. The first animals were smuggled into Switzerland only in 1906. Today, their population is large enough not to be considered endangered. Since 1977, even controlled shooting of capricorns is allowed. In general, the number of ibex in the Alps today is from 30 to 40 thousand animals. Capricorn populations of new areas are welcomed by local residents, as their presence is beneficial for tourist marketing of alpine resorts.

6. Interesting facts

Version 8.10 of the Linux Ubuntu operating system is called the Intrepid Ibex.

Alpine Goat, or Capricorn

Alpine goat, or capricorn - Capra ibex - lives on the slopes of the European Alps, preferring rocks and scree. In the mountains go to a height of 5000 m above sea level. Usually graze in alpine meadows, hiding among the rocks at the slightest danger. In the herd from 3-5 to 30-40 heads, females with young keep separately from adult males.

Capricorn pregnancy lasts 150-160 days, the female brings 1-2 cubs. They spend a week after birth in a shelter and lie, then they start walking after their mother, and at the age of one month they begin to pinch the grass.
Capricorns live 15-17 years.

Alpine Mountain Goat, or Capricorn (Capra ibex)

On average, an alpine mountain goat reaches a length of up to 150 cm and grows at the withers of about 90 cm. Females weigh about 40 kg, and males can weigh up to 100 kg. Males have impressive curved horns up to 1 m long, while females have only short, slightly curved horns. Both sexes have a beard. In summer, males have a dark brown coat color, and females are slightly reddish or with a golden hue. In winter, the coat of both sexes is gray.

Behavior

A typical herd of alpine mountain goats consists of 10-20 females and cubs. In addition to them, there are less stable herds of young bachelors, as well as mature males living alone. In the mating season, which lasts from December to January in the Alps, males visit herds and try to gain control over him. Between rival goats often comes to fights. In order to have a chance to win in such a duel and have his own herd, the male must be at least six years old. Throughout the winter, the male stays in the herd and leaves it in the spring.

After a pregnancy lasting from five to six months, the female in May or June gives birth to one, occasionally two, cub. The baby is able to stay on his feet from the first day, but remains with his mother and feeds on milk for about a year. The life span of an alpine mountain goat can reach 20 years.

Taxonomy

Alpine mountain goat is one of several species of the genus Capracalled capricorn. For accuracy, it is often called an ordinary capricorn. He is a close relative of the Siberian mountain goat (Capra sibirica), as well as the Nubian mountain goat (Capra nubia), which was previously classified as an alpine mountain goat. The remaining species are closer to the bezoar goat (Capra aegagrus).

Capricorn and man

In antiquity and in the Middle Ages, Capricorn was an object of strong mystification, as a result of which all of its attributes, from blood and hair to excrement, were used in medicine against all kinds of diseases. All this almost led to the extinction of Capricorn in Europe. At the beginning of the 19th century, the number of capricorns in the entire Alpine region barely exceeded 100 individuals, which were mainly preserved in the Italian Gran Paradiso. Forester Joseph Zumstein and naturalist Albert Girtanner managed to convince the authorities in 1816 to protect the last ibex in Gran Paradiso. In 1854, the king of Piedmont and Sardinia, Victor Emmanuel II, took capricorns under his personal protection. Thanks to the successful program for the new occupation of the Alpine mountains by capricorns, they are again found today in many parts of their original distribution area. All of today's capricorns come from those surviving 100 animals (see also bottleneck effect).

Despite the fact that Switzerland asked to sell her capricorns, Victor Emmanuel II did not allow their export. The first animals were smuggled into Switzerland only in 1906. Today, their population is large enough not to be considered endangered. Since 1977, even controlled shooting of capricorns is allowed. In general, the number of ibex in the Alps today is from 30 to 40 thousand animals. Capricorn populations of new areas are welcomed by local residents, as their presence is beneficial for tourist marketing of alpine resorts.

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