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The most popular breeds

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The long tail, which is especially impressive in Papuan decorated loris, allows us to distinguish these nectar-eating parrots from short-tailed loris. Lorikeet care and feeding requirements are similar to Loris. Their tongue looks like a brush on the device and is covered with papillae that help them capture nectar and pollen.
with flowers.

Care and conditions

Cleanliness is an important component of the correct keeping of these birds in aviaries. Their droppings will be easily removed from the shelter if it is covered with several layers of newspapers. All of the species described in the book are quite hardy, although it is desirable to provide some small lorikeets with a heated dwelling for the winter. These birds should be fed with a solution of nectar, and decorated loris (genus Charmosyna) and lorikeets (genus Trichoglossus) prefer this food in different concentrations. If in doubt, refer to the manufacturer's instructions (if you are using a ready-made concentrate) or consult an experienced breeder. Nectar should be given in special drinkers, and not in open bowls so that the birds do not bathe in it. For swimming, put a large container of water.

Birds should be given daily fresh fruit and nectar-soaked dry biscuits. Lorikeets also eat greens and vegetables, such as chopped carrots. These feeds are very important to ensure the required amount of fiber in the diet. Birds also need water, despite having liquid feed.

The requirements for nesting of these birds are the same as for short-tailed loris, although the size of the nesting house varies depending on the species. Multicolor lorikeet during the nesting period they behave quite destructively, so provide them with strong nesting houses. In addition, they sometimes pluck feathers from their chicks, although plumage will again grow in young birds a few weeks after leaving the nest.

Popular types of lorikeet


In these parrots, color mutations are quite rare, although they occur in multicolor lorikeet. Many species are endemic and live only on individual islands. In captivity, these birds are rare.

Multicolor lorikeet.

The number of subspecies of this lorikeet reaches 21, which is much larger than that of any other representative of the parrot family. The general color scheme for all subspecies is the same: the plumage on the head is dark, often bluish, bright spots on the sides of the neck, wings and back are green, and the chest is yellow, orange or red, and the feathers often have a darker border.

Subspecies haematodus, living in New Guinea and on the islands, is now widespread in Europe and North America. The color on the back of the head has a clear greenish tint.

Widespread in Australian collections subspecies moluccanus. These parrots are very bright: they have a scarlet chest, and the blue plumage on the head is brighter than that of haematodus. Among other subspecies it is worth mentioning capistratus, which lives on the Indonesian island of Timor, massena, inhabiting numerous islands east of New Guinea, mitchelli, found on the islands of Lombok and Bali.

Some subspecies may show slight differences in color between the female and the male, whose plumage on the chest is slightly brighter, although DNA selection is still required to select a pair.

These lorikeets can be maintained and propagated by the colony, provided that all individuals are settled in the aviary at the same time, and the number of nesting houses is greater than the number of pairs of birds.

Lorikeet Goldie.

This species lives in New Guinea, and in captivity it began to appear only in 1977. The relatively small lorikeets are quite prolific and are great for a small garden aviary, as they behave quietly. The characteristic plumage - the red color of the forehead and crown passes into purple on the sides of the head. The lower part of the body is mottled - green spots on a light yellow background. The sex of these birds in appearance cannot be determined; a paler color usually indicates a young age. In small quantities, they eat small seeds, such as millet, but the basis of their diet is nectar and fruits.

Decorated by Lori Stella.

Sometimes this species is considered a subspecies of the papuan decorated lory (Charmosyna papou). Compared with Papuan, the decorated Lori Stella is found in collections much more often. This is one of the most beautiful species of lorikeet living in New Guinea and found in nature in two forms. The red form has an amazing crimson hue of plumage, green wings and dark spots across the abdomen and behind the eyes. Females of this form can be easily identified by yellow spots on the tail. Melanists inhabit mainly mountainous areas and have almost completely glossy-black plumage, with the exception of a dark blue spot on the crown. Male melanists have red spots on the sides of the mantle, and in females this area is black. These are quiet, not prone to destruction birds.

Basic information

Spread: Australia, New Guinea and other Pacific islands

Painting Options: unknown

Compatibility: couples can sometimes be combined into a colony

Features: due to the peculiarities of feeding from these parrots, there is a lot of dirt, which prevents them from being kept indoors

Feeding: nectar and fruits such as apples, grapes or pomegranates

Typical diseases: candidiasis

Breeding: position the nesting house in a secluded corner of the aviary

Nest: nesting house measuring 25-30 x 25-30 x 28-35 cm, lined with large shavings

Typical masonry size: 2-3 eggs

Hatching Duration: days

Feeding during parental care: soft foods and flour worms

Out of socket: on the 9-11th week

Life span: 15 and more years

In these parrots, color mutations are quite rare, although they occur in multicolor lorikeet. Many species are endemic and live only on individual islands. In captivity, these birds are rare.

Multicolor Lorikeet (Trichoglossus baematodus). The number of subspecies of this lorikeet reaches 21, which is much larger than that of any other representative of the parrot family. The general color scheme for all subspecies is the same: the plumage on the head is dark, often bluish, bright spots on the sides of the neck, wings and back are green, and the chest is yellow, orange or red, and the feathers often have a darker border.

Subspecies T.b. haematodus, living in New Guinea and on the islands, is now widespread in Europe and North America. The color on the back of the head has a clear greenish tint. A subspecies of T. b. Is widespread in Australian collections. moluccanus. These parrots are very bright: they have a scarlet chest, and the blue plumage on the head is brighter than T.'s b. haematodus.

Among other subspecies, T. b. capistratus, living on the Indonesian island of Timor, T. b. massena, inhabiting numerous islands east of New Guinea and T. b. mitchelli found on the islands of Lombok and Bali. Some subspecies may show slight differences in color between the female and the male, whose plumage on the chest is slightly brighter, although DNA selection is still required to select a pair. These lorikeets can be maintained and propagated by the colony, provided that all individuals are settled in the aviary at the same time, and the number of nesting houses is greater than the number of pairs of birds.

Lorikeet Goldie (Trichoglossus goldiei). This species lives in New Guinea, and in captivity it began to appear only in 1977. The relatively small lorikeets are quite prolific and are great for a small garden aviary, as they behave quietly. The characteristic plumage - the red color of the forehead and crown passes into purple on the sides of the head. The lower part of the body is mottled - green spots on a light yellow background. The sex of these birds in appearance cannot be determined; a paler color usually indicates a young age. In small quantities, they eat small seeds, such as millet, but the basis of their diet is nectar and fruits.

Decorated by Lori Stella (Charmosyna stellae). Sometimes this species is considered a subspecies of the papuan decorated lori (Charmosyna rarou). Compared with Papuan, the decorated Lori Stella is found in collections much more often. This is one of the most beautiful species of lorikeet living in New Guinea and found in nature in two forms. The red form has an amazing crimson hue of plumage, green wings and dark spots across the abdomen and behind the eyes. Females of this form can be easily identified by yellow spots on the tail. Melanists inhabit mainly mountainous areas and have almost completely glossy-black plumage, with the exception of a dark blue spot on the crown. Male melanists have red spots on the sides of the mantle, and in females this area is black. These are quiet, not prone to destruction birds.

Description:

The Stella's Lorikeet averages 15 1/2 "(39 cm) in length. The tail is longer than the body. One of the dimorphic (sexes are visually different) species. The wings are green, as is the mantle and upper tail. Head , under wing coverts, and underparts are scarlet. The scarlet on the breast has a purple sheen in the correct light. Hens have yellow thighs and lower back.

There is a melanistic phase where the normal red is replaced by purple / black. In this phase the male has red thighs and lower back, the hen's being black.

Very quiet, as are all of the Charmosynas. Even wild caught Stella's become quite tame. Wonderful birds! Always at play, rolling on the cage floor or swinging by one foot from the top. . (Description by Dick Schroeder - Owner of Cuttlebone Plus and Expert Breeder / Keeper of Lories).

Taxonomy

Genus: Scientific: Charmosyna. English: Honey Lorikeet. Dutch: Honingpapegaaien. German: Zierloris. French: loriquet de miele

Species: Scientific: Charmosyna papou stellae. English: Stella's Lorikeet. Dutch: Stella Lori, Stella's Honinglori. German: Stellas Papualori. French: Loriquet de Stella

Other Relevant Web Resources

  • Photos of the Different Lory Species for Identification. Listing of species
  • Distribution Maps of Lories and Lorikeets
  • Lories and Lorikeets in Aviculture
  • Feeding and Housing Your Lories and Lorikeets
  • Diseases of Lories / Lorikeets and Health Care Program
  • Special Challenges of Lories and Lorikeets: Training and Behavioral Guidance

Species Research by Sibylle Johnson

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